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Four Crises and a Peace Process

PR Chari, Pervaiz Iqbal Cheema and Stephen P Cohen
 

About the Book

This book co-authored by PR Chari (Research Professor, IPCS) is a collaborative effort involving strategic analysts from India, Pakistan and the United States.

India and Pakistan, nuclear neighbors and rivals, fought the last of three major wars in 1971. Far from peaceful, however, the period since then has been "one long crisis, punctuated by periods of peace." The long-disputed Kashmir issue continues to be both a cause and consequence of India-Pakistan hostility.

Four Crises and a Peace Process focuses on four contained conflicts on the subcontinent: the Brasstacks Crisis of 1986-1987, the Compound Crisis of 1990, the Kargil Conflict of 1999, and the Border Confrontation of 2001-2002. Authors P.R. Chari, Pervaiz Iqbal Cheema, and Brookings senior fellow Stephen P. Cohen explain the underlying causes of these crises, their consequences, the lessons that can be learned, and the American role in each.

The four crises are notable because any one of them could have escalated to a large-scale conflict, or even all-out war, and three took place after India and Pakistan had gone nuclear. Looking for larger trends of peace and conflict in the region, the authors consider these incidents as cases of attempted conflict resolution, as instances of limited war by nuclear-armed nations, and as examples of intervention and engagement by the United States and China. They analyze the reactions of Indian, Pakistani, and international media and assess the two countries' decision-making processes.

Four Crises and a Peace Process explains how these crises have affected regional and international policy and evaluates the prospects for lasting peace in South Asia.


Table of Contents
Foreword
Acknowledgments
1 Fifteen Years, Four Crises
2 South Asia's Crises
3 The Brasstacks Crisis of 1986-87
4 The Compound Crisis of 1990
5 The Kargil Conflict
6 The 2001-02 Border Confrontation
7 Peace and War in South Asia

About the Author(s)
P. R. Chari is currently Research Professor, Institute of Peace and Conflict Studies (IPCS), New Delhi. He is a former member of the Indian Administrative Service (1960 batch/Madhya Pradesh cadre). He served in several senior positions in the Central and State Governments, and sought voluntary retirement in 1992 after 32 years in the government. He was Director of the Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses (IDSA), New Delhi (1975–80), International Fellow, Centre for International Affairs, Harvard University (1983–84), Visiting Fellow, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (1998), and his books include Security and Governance in South Asia (Manohar, 2001).

Pervaiz Iqbal Cheema is president of the Islamabad Policy Research Institute. His publications include The Armed Forces of Pakistan (Allen and Unwin, 2002).

Stephen Philip Cohen is a senior fellow in the Foreign Policy Studies program at the Brookings Institution. He is the author of classic books on India's and Pakistan's armies and the widely praised India: Emerging Power (Brookings, 2001). He was a member of the Policy Planning Staff of the U.S. Department of State and before joining Brookings was a faculty member at the University of Illinois.


Washington DC: Brookings Institution Press, 2007
 
 
 
 

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